Science

At Wilnecote High School we aim to provide all our students with both the scientific knowledge and transferable lifelong skills in the form of practical lessons.

We condense Key Stage 3 Science in to the first 2 years. We use this time to teach a strong foundation of key scientific concepts but also to develop the skills that will allow our students to fully access the GCSE content later on.

Year 7 and 8 classes are all ability groups with the class teacher differentiating their lessons to suit the needs of individual pupils.

In year 9 our students begin to study the course content for GCSE. This is to allow sufficient time to cover all required aspects of the three subject areas; Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

In year 10 students will have chosen to follow either the double award pathway or the separate sciences pathway. Those that opt for the double award route will follow the AQA Trilogy course and achieve a qualification which is equivalent to two GCSEs. Those that opt to follow the separate sciences pathway will achieve three separate GCSEs in each of the three sciences biology, chemistry and physics. Much of the content is common to both pathways and students study this in all ability groups. The additional content requited for the separate sciences is studied in five additional lessons per fortnight for the students following this pathway.

All students cover the same topics but the level that they work at is based upon prior knowledge and achievement.

Year 7:

Students follow project based units based on the following themes:

Going to Mars; The Olympics; The Ancient World; Forensics; Oceans; Hospitals

Year 8:

Forces and Motion; Electricity; Pressure; Chemical Reactions; Circulatory System; Photosynthesis; Breathing; Variation; Elements and Compounds; Dissolving; Magnets

Year 9:

Students begin to study for their GCSE course (see KS4 tab)

Key Stage 4

Year 9, Year 10 & Year 11

Double award (Trilogy) course content is compulsory for all students regardless of options.

For the Trilogy course the content is structured as follows:

Year 9

Cell Biology; Organisation; Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table; Bonding, Structure and the Properties of Matter; Energy; Electricity

Year 10:

Infection and Response; Bioenergetics; Homeostasis and Response; Quantitative Chemistry; Chemical Changes; Energy Changes; Rates of Reactions; The Particle Model of Matter; Atomic Structure; Forces and Motion

Year 11:

Inheritance and Response; Ecology; Organic chemistry; Chemical Analysis; The Atmosphere; Using Resources; Waves; Magnetism and Electromagnetism

This content is assessed in six papers each lasting 1 hour 15 minutes. All are of equal weighting.

Those students opting for the Separate Science pathway will have the following additional content:

Biology

  • Culturing microorganisms
  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Plant disease
  • The brain
  • The eye
  • Control of body temperature
  • Maintaining water and nitrogen balance in the body
  • Plant hormones
  • Advantages and disadvantages of sexual and asexual reproduction
  • DNA structure
  • Cloning
  • Theory of evolution
  • Speciation
  • The understanding of genetics
  • Decomposition
  • Impact of environmental change
  • Trophic levels in an ecosystem
  • Food production

Chemistry:

  • Properties of transition metals
  • Bulk and surface properties of matter including nanoparticles
  • Yield and atom economy of chemical reactions
  • Using concentrations of solutions in mol/dm3
  • Use of amount of substance in relation to volumes of gases
  • Titrations
  • Chemical cells and fuel cells
  • Reactions and alkenes and alcohols
  • Synthetic and naturally occurring polymers
  • Identification of ions by chemical and spectroscopic means
  • Using materials
  • The Haber process and the use of NPK fertilisers

Physics:

  • Static electricity
  • Pressure in gases
  • Increasing the pressure of a gas
  • Hazards and uses of radioactive emissions and of background radiation
  • Nuclear fission and fusion
  • Moments, levers and gears
  • Pressure and pressure differences in fluids
  • Changes in momentum
  • Reflection of waves
  • Sound waves
  • Waves for detection and exploration
  • Lenses
  • Visible light
  • Black body radiation
  • Loudspeakers
  • Induced potential, transformers and the National Grid
  • Space Physics
  • Solar system; stability of orbital motions; satellites
  • Red shift

This content, along with the core content, will be assessed in six papers each lasting 1 hour 45 minutes.

 

Separate Science:

Years 10 & 11

Additional topics to be delivered to Separate Science only

Final Assessment for Triple Science (6 written papers total)

key Stage 3

All students cover the same topics but the level that they work at is based upon prior knowledge and achievement.

Year 7:

Students follow project based units based on the following themes:

Going to Mars; The Olympics; The Ancient World; Forensics; Oceans; Hospitals

Year 8:

Forces and Motion; Electricity; Pressure; Chemical Reactions; Circulatory System; Photosynthesis; Breathing; Variation; Elements and Compounds; Dissolving; Magnets

Year 9:

Students begin to study for their GCSE course (see KS4 tab)

Key Stage 4

Key Stage 4

Year 9, Year 10 & Year 11

Double award (Trilogy) course content is compulsory for all students regardless of options.

For the Trilogy course the content is structured as follows:

Year 9

Cell Biology; Organisation; Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table; Bonding, Structure and the Properties of Matter; Energy; Electricity

Year 10:

Infection and Response; Bioenergetics; Homeostasis and Response; Quantitative Chemistry; Chemical Changes; Energy Changes; Rates of Reactions; The Particle Model of Matter; Atomic Structure; Forces and Motion

Year 11:

Inheritance and Response; Ecology; Organic chemistry; Chemical Analysis; The Atmosphere; Using Resources; Waves; Magnetism and Electromagnetism

This content is assessed in six papers each lasting 1 hour 15 minutes. All are of equal weighting.

Those students opting for the Separate Science pathway will have the following additional content:

Biology

  • Culturing microorganisms
  • Monoclonal antibodies
  • Plant disease
  • The brain
  • The eye
  • Control of body temperature
  • Maintaining water and nitrogen balance in the body
  • Plant hormones
  • Advantages and disadvantages of sexual and asexual reproduction
  • DNA structure
  • Cloning
  • Theory of evolution
  • Speciation
  • The understanding of genetics
  • Decomposition
  • Impact of environmental change
  • Trophic levels in an ecosystem
  • Food production

Chemistry:

  • Properties of transition metals
  • Bulk and surface properties of matter including nanoparticles
  • Yield and atom economy of chemical reactions
  • Using concentrations of solutions in mol/dm3
  • Use of amount of substance in relation to volumes of gases
  • Titrations
  • Chemical cells and fuel cells
  • Reactions and alkenes and alcohols
  • Synthetic and naturally occurring polymers
  • Identification of ions by chemical and spectroscopic means
  • Using materials
  • The Haber process and the use of NPK fertilisers

Physics:

  • Static electricity
  • Pressure in gases
  • Increasing the pressure of a gas
  • Hazards and uses of radioactive emissions and of background radiation
  • Nuclear fission and fusion
  • Moments, levers and gears
  • Pressure and pressure differences in fluids
  • Changes in momentum
  • Reflection of waves
  • Sound waves
  • Waves for detection and exploration
  • Lenses
  • Visible light
  • Black body radiation
  • Loudspeakers
  • Induced potential, transformers and the National Grid
  • Space Physics
  • Solar system; stability of orbital motions; satellites
  • Red shift

This content, along with the core content, will be assessed in six papers each lasting 1 hour 45 minutes.

 

Separate Science:

Years 10 & 11

Additional topics to be delivered to Separate Science only

Final Assessment for Triple Science (6 written papers total)