RE

The RE Department at The Wilnecote School aims to inspire students whilst developing an intellectual curiosity about current affairs and ethical issues, as well as philosophical questions and religious and cultural beliefs. We do this by exploring a range of topics such as “Is war ever right?”, “How should society respond to evil?” and what is the best way to mark significant points in one’s life journey. Lessons contain a rich variety of sources which include case studies, personal testimony, photographs, written text, video clips and debating skills. Students delve into the issue of how societies decide what is right and wrong and the need to evaluate critically the views of others.  Students are also taught to recognise the complex relationships that exist between political, religious and secular authorities.

A variety of skills are practised in lessons and cross curricular links are made with lessons such as Science, Maths, English and ICT to enable students to deepen their understanding further.

In key stage 3 students study 3 hours of Humanities on their timetable – one hour for each of our subject areas; Geography, History and Religious Education.

Students are offered Geography, History and Religious Studies (Religion and Ethics) as optional subjects at Key Stage 4.

Year 7

In Year 7 students explore some core beliefs within a variety of religions.  They develop the skills of being able to explain and compare these beliefs. The key RE skill of evaluating views is introduced, which equips students to explain both their own view and the view of others, through debating skills and written assessments.

 Autumn term: Is God real? / Is Christmas pointless?   Various evidence, from both a theist and an atheist perspective is researched, allowing students to reach an informed decision on whether they believe in God/Gods. After half term students decide whether the modern festival of Christmas has retained any Christian tradition or value.

Spring term: Who is the best leader? / Why would someone choose to become a Buddhist?

Criteria for good leadership are examined and students follow the teachings, early lives and impact of Jesus, Muhammad, Buddha and Gandhi in order to reach a decision on who they feel could be named as the best leader. After half term decisions made by people at secular turning points in their lives are explored as well as the reasons why Buddhism might prove attractive to some as a religion.  Buddhist teachings and traditions are analysed.

Summer term: Rites of passage and ceremonies. Christian baptism and the Sikh naming ceremony are contrasted.  Secular ideas of rites of passage for attaining adulthood are examined and the Jewish Bar / Bat Mitzvah is studied.

Year 8

In Year 8 students continue to develop their skills of describing and comparing religious viewpoints, and exploring different views.

The ethical choices facing individuals are also considered in terms of how religious and other beliefs can affect their actions.

Autumn term: Life after death The beliefs and practices of both religious and non-religious communities are explored.  Traditions both secular and religious surrounding death are examined. Students are encouraged to reflect on the differences between funeral traditions, and explain the reasons for these differences.

 

Spring term: Good and evil / Is war ever justified After half term the philosophy behind what is considered to be good and evil is discussed in order for students to form their own definition.  Various events are then studied in order to test this definition, including the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Different attitudes to war are examined after half term, including the concept of a Just War (from traditions of Christianity and Islam). Several conflicts both historical and recent are examined and judgements made by students over whether wars in these circumstances could be justified.

Summer term: The Holocaust – a detailed study of the effect of this historical event on the Jewish community is undertaken in the final term.  Different examples of dehumanisation are examined, as well as the role of people who challenged the Nazi Final Solution and tried to retain a sense of humanity in the most extreme circumstances.

Aims

  • To consider and respond to a range of current moral and ethical questions, such as war, animal testing and abortion.
  • To investigate and respond to fundamental questions about life, such as the purpose of life and the nature of evil.
  • To explore the views of different religious believers and traditions in relation to these questions. To compare these to your own beliefs so that you can reflect on your own values.
  • To develop your analytical skills.
  • To develop your understanding of different viewpoints and attitudes.

In these units candidates reflect on the idea that religions have different approaches and attitudes and that there is diversity within each faith, its understanding of texts and its philosophy.

They will consider these issues in relation to the particular religion itself and to its impact on individuals, communities and societies, locally, nationally and globally and realise that these particular aspects may vary in significance between religions and communities.

The GCSE will be the AQA A new specification and the religions studied will be Christianity and Islam.

If you are interested in discussing, debating and writing about any of these topics this course is for you.  It builds on what you did in Key Stage 3 and gives you the opportunity to present your own thoughts and opinions on the issues above.  It’s an interesting and valuable GCSE for anyone wanting to develop their knowledge of both controversial issues in the news today, as well as the perspectives and beliefs of Christianity and other religions. This GCSE develops high levels of skills of evaluation, presentation and analysis. You will need to keep up to date with current affairs, and take detailed notes from your lessons.  There are class tests throughout the course, and the learning for these is often set as homework to help you develop the revision skills necessary for the final exam.

A joint History and RE year 9 trip to Beth Shalom Holocaust memorial centre near Nottingham –  students are able to hear from and question a Holocaust survivor.

Key Stage 3

Year 7

In Year 7 students explore some core beliefs within a variety of religions.  They develop the skills of being able to explain and compare these beliefs. The key RE skill of evaluating views is introduced, which equips students to explain both their own view and the view of others, through debating skills and written assessments.

 Autumn term: Is God real? / Is Christmas pointless?   Various evidence, from both a theist and an atheist perspective is researched, allowing students to reach an informed decision on whether they believe in God/Gods. After half term students decide whether the modern festival of Christmas has retained any Christian tradition or value.

Spring term: Who is the best leader? / Why would someone choose to become a Buddhist?

Criteria for good leadership are examined and students follow the teachings, early lives and impact of Jesus, Muhammad, Buddha and Gandhi in order to reach a decision on who they feel could be named as the best leader. After half term decisions made by people at secular turning points in their lives are explored as well as the reasons why Buddhism might prove attractive to some as a religion.  Buddhist teachings and traditions are analysed.

Summer term: Rites of passage and ceremonies. Christian baptism and the Sikh naming ceremony are contrasted.  Secular ideas of rites of passage for attaining adulthood are examined and the Jewish Bar / Bat Mitzvah is studied.

Year 8

In Year 8 students continue to develop their skills of describing and comparing religious viewpoints, and exploring different views.

The ethical choices facing individuals are also considered in terms of how religious and other beliefs can affect their actions.

Autumn term: Life after death The beliefs and practices of both religious and non-religious communities are explored.  Traditions both secular and religious surrounding death are examined. Students are encouraged to reflect on the differences between funeral traditions, and explain the reasons for these differences.

 

Spring term: Good and evil / Is war ever justified After half term the philosophy behind what is considered to be good and evil is discussed in order for students to form their own definition.  Various events are then studied in order to test this definition, including the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Different attitudes to war are examined after half term, including the concept of a Just War (from traditions of Christianity and Islam). Several conflicts both historical and recent are examined and judgements made by students over whether wars in these circumstances could be justified.

Summer term: The Holocaust – a detailed study of the effect of this historical event on the Jewish community is undertaken in the final term.  Different examples of dehumanisation are examined, as well as the role of people who challenged the Nazi Final Solution and tried to retain a sense of humanity in the most extreme circumstances.

Key Stage 4

Aims

  • To consider and respond to a range of current moral and ethical questions, such as war, animal testing and abortion.
  • To investigate and respond to fundamental questions about life, such as the purpose of life and the nature of evil.
  • To explore the views of different religious believers and traditions in relation to these questions. To compare these to your own beliefs so that you can reflect on your own values.
  • To develop your analytical skills.
  • To develop your understanding of different viewpoints and attitudes.

In these units candidates reflect on the idea that religions have different approaches and attitudes and that there is diversity within each faith, its understanding of texts and its philosophy.

They will consider these issues in relation to the particular religion itself and to its impact on individuals, communities and societies, locally, nationally and globally and realise that these particular aspects may vary in significance between religions and communities.

The GCSE will be the AQA A new specification and the religions studied will be Christianity and Islam.

If you are interested in discussing, debating and writing about any of these topics this course is for you.  It builds on what you did in Key Stage 3 and gives you the opportunity to present your own thoughts and opinions on the issues above.  It’s an interesting and valuable GCSE for anyone wanting to develop their knowledge of both controversial issues in the news today, as well as the perspectives and beliefs of Christianity and other religions. This GCSE develops high levels of skills of evaluation, presentation and analysis. You will need to keep up to date with current affairs, and take detailed notes from your lessons.  There are class tests throughout the course, and the learning for these is often set as homework to help you develop the revision skills necessary for the final exam.

Extra Curricular

A joint History and RE year 9 trip to Beth Shalom Holocaust memorial centre near Nottingham –  students are able to hear from and question a Holocaust survivor.