History

The History course at Wilnecote aims to encourage a passion for studying the events of the past and to equip students with the skills necessary to pursue the study of History beyond GCSE, if they wish.

It investigates a range of topics from the Middle Ages through the Tudors up to the modern day. In doing so it helps students to a) appreciate how and why the world has changed, b) develop an understanding of how people in the past lived their lives and c) evaluate how attitudes/beliefs in the past were similar/different to those of the modern day.

Running throughout are several core historical skills: handling and interpreting sources of evidence, evaluating different historical interpretations, explaining the cause of events and weighing up arguments in order to reach an overall judgement. Whilst a study of History might lead directly to careers in teaching, archaeology or museum work, it is these core skills that are highly valued in many areas of work, which is why those who have studied history are often successful in law, politics, and journalism.

Year 7

Autumn Term: Norman Conquest

This unit considers why William the Conqueror decided to invade England in 1066, why he won at the Battle of Hastings and how he was able to establish control over the country afterwards. It focuses on the skills of inference and causation.

Spring term: Medicine, Murder and Mayhem

This unit investigates 3 key events in the Middle Ages, asking students to decide who was most to blame for the murder of Thomas Becket, to analyse the impact of the Black Death on society and to prioritise the causes of the Peasants’ Revolt.

Summer Term:

At GCSE students study a unit charting the development of medicine over time. To prepare for this, the summer term also takes a thematic unit: crime. It uses 2 case studies to make comparisons between what was considered a crime and how the crimes were treated. The case studies are on the witchcraze and Jack the Ripper.

Year 8

Autumn Term; World War One

This unit explains the causes of the war in 1914 before investigating why people joined up, what trench warfare was like, and why it was hard for either side to “win”. There is a focus on source skills as well as tackling judgement questions like “Was General Haig guilty of slaughtering his own men?”

Spring term: the fight for women’s suffrage

This unit looks at the tactics used by the suffragists and suffragettes to win the vote for women. It evaluates to what extent their tactics were successful and analyses the death of Emily Davison in depth, investigating the sources to decide if her death was an accident or an act of deliberate suicide.

Summer Term

The final unit of KS3 looks at life in Nazi Germany. It investigates how the Nazis kept control and how the lives of different groups of people (eg women and the youth of Germany) were affected. In order to tie in with the summer term RE unit, it also considers the Holocaust.

The department follows the Edexcel GCSE course.

Year 9

Medicine in Britain 1250 – present, including the British Sector of the Western front (a study of an historic environment)

The first unit looks at how medicine has developed in Britain between 1250 and the modern day. It considers 4 time periods (the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Industrial Revolution and the Modern Day) and in each period looks at what people believed caused disease, how they treated and prevented illness and hospital care. Students are asked to compare the different periods and to explain why medicine changed over time. The unit covers topics such as The Black Death, the work of Florence Nightingale, the discovery of antibiotics and modern government health campaigns.

There are 3 key skills: Describing similarities/differences between 2 periods, explaining change and judging what the most important changes were.

At the end of the overview of medicine, there is a focused case study which examines how medicine developed during World War One. It looks at the context of trench warfare, what new injuries this caused and then at how medicine developed to tackle these injuries. The skills are focused on source work.

Early Elizabethan England 1558-88

Towards the end of year 9, we begin the second unit on Elizabeth I. We start by investigating the first years of her reign (1558-69) weighing up the various challenges she faced (eg the threat from abroad, her system of government, the problems caused by her own illegitimacy in many people’s eyes and the attempts to tackle the religious division of her country)

For the skills – see year 10

Year 10

Early Elizabethan England 1558-88

The year begins with the second part of the Elizabeth unit. First it considers the threats to Elizabeth that developed between 1569 and 1588. In particular, it focuses on the catholic threat in England, that revolved around Mary, Queen of Scots, and the deteriorating relationship with Spain that ultimately led to the Spanish Armada.

The final unit then looks at Elizabethan society looking at the treatment of the poor, the growth of some leisure activities and the reasons for (and success of) the attempts to explore the world and build colonies in the Americas.

The main skills in this unit are: describing key features, explaining why events happened and making judgements. As such the questions are very similar to those on the Medicine paper.

Superpower relations and the Cold War 1941-91

The third GCSE unit examines the relations between USA and USSR between 1941 and 1991. It starts by considering why these two allies in World War Two “fell out” and why, therefore, the Cold War began. It moves on to consider the main Cold War crises/flashpoints, notably the building of the Berlin Wall in 1961 and the Cuban Missile Crisis. Finally, it explains why the Cold War came to a sudden end at the end of the 1980s.

The main skills are focused on explaining the consequences of an event, explaining why an event is important and writing an analytical narrative.

Year 11

USA 1954-75; Conflict at home and abroad

The final GCSE unit is a modern world depth study that looks at 2 main topics. First it examines the campaign for Black Civil Rights. It starts by examining the problems that Black Americans faced at the start of 1950s before looking at key events that tried to tackle the discrimination: eg The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the marches at Selma. The strategies of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X are compared before a judgment is reached on how successful the campaigns were. In the second part of the course, the focus switches to the war in Vietnam. It explains why America became involved in the war, how Americans reacted to this and why USA ultimately lost.

The main skills are based round source work and the ability to examine, explain and evaluate different historical interpretations of the past.

 

CONTACT US

Mr Farrell

Mrs Houghton

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Autumn Term: Norman Conquest

This unit considers why William the Conqueror decided to invade England in 1066, why he won at the Battle of Hastings and how he was able to establish control over the country afterwards. It focuses on the skills of inference and causation.

Spring term: Medicine, Murder and Mayhem

This unit investigates 3 key events in the Middle Ages, asking students to decide who was most to blame for the murder of Thomas Becket, to analyse the impact of the Black Death on society and to prioritise the causes of the Peasants’ Revolt.

Summer Term:

At GCSE students study a unit charting the development of medicine over time. To prepare for this, the summer term also takes a thematic unit: crime. It uses 2 case studies to make comparisons between what was considered a crime and how the crimes were treated. The case studies are on the witchcraze and Jack the Ripper.

Year 8

Autumn Term; World War One

This unit explains the causes of the war in 1914 before investigating why people joined up, what trench warfare was like, and why it was hard for either side to “win”. There is a focus on source skills as well as tackling judgement questions like “Was General Haig guilty of slaughtering his own men?”

Spring term: the fight for women’s suffrage

This unit looks at the tactics used by the suffragists and suffragettes to win the vote for women. It evaluates to what extent their tactics were successful and analyses the death of Emily Davison in depth, investigating the sources to decide if her death was an accident or an act of deliberate suicide.

Summer Term

The final unit of KS3 looks at life in Nazi Germany. It investigates how the Nazis kept control and how the lives of different groups of people (eg women and the youth of Germany) were affected. In order to tie in with the summer term RE unit, it also considers the Holocaust.

Key Stage 4

The department follows the Edexcel GCSE course.

Year 9

Medicine in Britain 1250 – present, including the British Sector of the Western front (a study of an historic environment)

The first unit looks at how medicine has developed in Britain between 1250 and the modern day. It considers 4 time periods (the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Industrial Revolution and the Modern Day) and in each period looks at what people believed caused disease, how they treated and prevented illness and hospital care. Students are asked to compare the different periods and to explain why medicine changed over time. The unit covers topics such as The Black Death, the work of Florence Nightingale, the discovery of antibiotics and modern government health campaigns.

There are 3 key skills: Describing similarities/differences between 2 periods, explaining change and judging what the most important changes were.

At the end of the overview of medicine, there is a focused case study which examines how medicine developed during World War One. It looks at the context of trench warfare, what new injuries this caused and then at how medicine developed to tackle these injuries. The skills are focused on source work.

Early Elizabethan England 1558-88

Towards the end of year 9, we begin the second unit on Elizabeth I. We start by investigating the first years of her reign (1558-69) weighing up the various challenges she faced (eg the threat from abroad, her system of government, the problems caused by her own illegitimacy in many people’s eyes and the attempts to tackle the religious division of her country)

For the skills – see year 10

Year 10

Early Elizabethan England 1558-88

The year begins with the second part of the Elizabeth unit. First it considers the threats to Elizabeth that developed between 1569 and 1588. In particular, it focuses on the catholic threat in England, that revolved around Mary, Queen of Scots, and the deteriorating relationship with Spain that ultimately led to the Spanish Armada.

The final unit then looks at Elizabethan society looking at the treatment of the poor, the growth of some leisure activities and the reasons for (and success of) the attempts to explore the world and build colonies in the Americas.

The main skills in this unit are: describing key features, explaining why events happened and making judgements. As such the questions are very similar to those on the Medicine paper.

Superpower relations and the Cold War 1941-91

The third GCSE unit examines the relations between USA and USSR between 1941 and 1991. It starts by considering why these two allies in World War Two “fell out” and why, therefore, the Cold War began. It moves on to consider the main Cold War crises/flashpoints, notably the building of the Berlin Wall in 1961 and the Cuban Missile Crisis. Finally, it explains why the Cold War came to a sudden end at the end of the 1980s.

The main skills are focused on explaining the consequences of an event, explaining why an event is important and writing an analytical narrative.

Year 11

USA 1954-75; Conflict at home and abroad

The final GCSE unit is a modern world depth study that looks at 2 main topics. First it examines the campaign for Black Civil Rights. It starts by examining the problems that Black Americans faced at the start of 1950s before looking at key events that tried to tackle the discrimination: eg The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the marches at Selma. The strategies of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X are compared before a judgment is reached on how successful the campaigns were. In the second part of the course, the focus switches to the war in Vietnam. It explains why America became involved in the war, how Americans reacted to this and why USA ultimately lost.

The main skills are based round source work and the ability to examine, explain and evaluate different historical interpretations of the past.

 

CONTACT US

Mr Farrell

Mrs Houghton

GCSE Revision